Hip

Osteoarthritis (Hip OA)

The hip is made of a ball and socket joint, called the femoroacetabular joint. The acetabulum (socket) and head of the femur (ball) are covered in cartilage to allow for smooth hip movement. The cartilage will wear away with age or direct injury. Symptoms include groin pain that increases with activity. Common complaints are hip stiffness and reduced range of motion. Discomfort can be found in groin, buttock or thigh, usually in morning. Knee and low back pain can also be referred from hip. Goal: Increase hip and lumbar ROM and flexibility, decrease STRs surrounding hip musculature, improve hip and core stabilization.

Femoroacetabular Impingement

The hip is made of a ball and socket joint, called the femoroacetabular joint. The joint can have bony abnormalities located on the socket (acetabulum) and/or the ball (femur) that occur during childhood. These bone spurs can rub on the joint and wear away the cartilage. This will cause pain, pinching, and catching or snapping in the hip joint. Common complaints include pain in groin, lateral hip, buttocks, and low back. Athletes are at greater risk with increased use of their hip during sports. Symptoms are aggravated by prolonged sitting, getting in/out of a car, squatting, climbing stairs. Goal: Increase hip and lumbar ROM and flexibility, decrease STRs surrounding hip musculature, improve hip and core stabilization.

Labral Tear

The hip is made of a ball and socket joint, called the femoroacetabular joint. The joint can have bony abnormalities located on the socket (acetabulum) and/or the ball (femur) that occur during childhood. These bone spurs can rub on the joint and wear away the cartilage and labrum. The labrum acts as both a cushion and a seal to keep the ball in the socket. A tear to the labrum will cause pinching and locking of the joint as well as loss of stability. Common complaints include pain in groin, lateral hip, buttocks, and low back. Athletes are at greater risk with increased use of their hip during sports. Symptoms are aggravated by prolonged sitting, getting in/out of a car, squatting, climbing stairs. Goal: Increase hip and lumbar ROM and flexibility, decrease STRs surrounding hip musculature, improve hip and core stabilization.

Piriformis Syndrome

The piriformis is a large muscle in the buttocks whose primary function is to rotate the hip and thigh laterally. The sciatic nerve runs next to this muscle and will be inflamed or irritated if the piriformis is irritated.  Symptoms include stinging pain, numbness, or tingling. These symptoms can remain local to the buttocks or radiated pain down the back of the thigh. Common complaints of increased pain are caused by prolonged sitting or standing. Athletes can aggravate the piriformis muscle with repetitive movement and weakened hip musculature. Avoid prolonged sitting, standing, and decrease running or cycling. Goal: Increase hip and lumbar ROM and flexibility, decrease STRs surrounding hip musculature, increase hip and core stabilization.

Sacroiliac Joint Dsyfunction (SIJ)

The sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is made up of the hip bones (iliac crests) and the sacrum, which is the triangular bone between your (Lumbar) spine and tailbone (coccyx). The space between the ilium and sacrum is the Sacroiliac joint. This area can become too tight or have excessive motion and create instability. Common complaints of pain include lower back pain (below L5), a sensation of leg pain, numbness, tingling, or weakness and buttock pain. Other complaints include hip or groin pain, leg instability (giving out), disturbed sleep due to pain, and difficulty sitting prolonged periods. Goal: restore lumbar spine and hip ROM, decrease STRs at SIJ and pelvic musculature, increase lumbopelvic stabilization.

Trochanteric bursitis is the inflammation of the lateral hip bursa, located on the greater trochanter of the femur. Bursas are fluid-filled sacs found all over our bodies and serve as padding to reduce friction between tissues and bones. The bursa can become irritated from repetitive activity (running, cycling, walking) or postures (side lying, crossing legs while sitting). Usually this irritation begins with an increase in activity with secondary hip and core instability. Goal: Increase hip and knee ROM and flexibility, and improve hip and knee stabilization.

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